The economic crash and recession has affected everyone’s lives, and it’s no secret that the travel industry has been hit particularly hard. While many sectors of the travel business have been receiving government support, whether in the form of giant subsidies like the airlines receive or marketing from local government to promote tourism, one important sector has not been completely ignored, but has been actively under siege: offsite travel parking businesses. Whether cruise port or airport parking, parking businesses across the country have been facing obstacles whose size and number the industry has never seen before.

One of those obstacles, one more easily dealt with but still of concern, has been the privatization of parking management at many cruise ports and airports. Parking authorities and management are notoriously plagued with waste, inefficiency and corruption, so much so that they’ve bankrupted cities on more than one occasion (I’m looking at you Scranton). As many municipalities have been gripped by crushing budget shortfalls, they’ve finally been paying attention to their under-utilized and mismanaged parking programs. One relatively easy solution to these problems has been to lease or contract out their parking services to a large private parking firm such as Standard Parking. These private management firms will typically pay a lump sum to lease the parking infrastructure from the city for years or even decades at a time, giving the city a big short term windfall, such as what Chicago did with their entire parking system. When they take over a parking facility, these companies frequently invest in infrastructure improvement as well as upgrading facilities with the latest parking technologies and management systems, dramatically improving service and efficiency and putting far more competitive pressure on offsite travel parking businesses.

Now this in and of itself is not a bad thing. Competition is good for the market, as it means better service and prices that more accurately reflect the level of service that you’re getting. And frankly, there are offsite parking businesses that are not well run and have only been able to survive because their county-owned competition was even worse; these businesses being forced to meet basic business standards or go under is a good thing for travelers and the parking business as a whole. Where this becomes a problem is when local governments try to interfere with the market and use their ability to control and abuse the laws and ordnances governing the business to drive out the private competition. A great example of this is Port Canaveral, Florida. I’ve written about the Port Authority there and their downright repugnant attempts to kill the local parking businesses there on a number of occasions (and about one incredibly unsavory illegal business “owner” that they allowed to operate under their noses for years with no license). And the situation there, while extreme, is far from unique. Across the country, local governments have been using their authority to unfairly bludgeon offsite travel parking businesses.

For instance, earlier this month the Indianapolis airport finally gave up their fight to keep any parking businesses from opening near the airport. You see, back in 2008 the Indianapolis International Airport moved to a new location, while at the same time not approving any permits for new parking facilities to be built near it. This move had forced a number of off-site parking facilities to close, as they no longer were close enough. It was rather shocking, as I lived in Indiana until the end of 2008 and flew out of Indianapolis frequently, and always parked in one of the close to half dozen parking facilities there. When I started working in the parking business a few years later and was looking to contact Indianapolis parking facilities, I was shocked to find that that there was only one left. That was because the Airport Authority has been wasting money in court for years fighting the development of new off-site parking, a battle which they finally gave up earlier this month after three failed appeals and more than $55,000 wasted, and more than $250,000 in legal fees spent by the business they were fighting. And all so they could maintain a government created monopoly.

And these are just a couple examples. In part two of this story, we’ll look at some of the other ways local governments have been putting the squeeze on the travel parking business and the motivations behind those moves, and how they have had a chilling effect on the investment side of travel parking, changing what was once viewed one of the most stable industries to invest in to one which now faces unprecedented amounts of uncertainty. All this and more in part two of The Big Squeeze.

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Comments
  1. […] to massive debt or even bankruptcy for a city without them even knowing about it until it happens. As usual, the city is interested in using the funds from the lease of their parking assets to pay for […]

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